Wednesday, 27 October 2010

EVENINGS
















Trippy, reflective bliss from talented musician Nathan Broaddust, definitely one to watch (and listen to) very closely indeed, ace!

First off, where are you in the world right now and what're you working on?
I'm sitting in a library, and I'm supposed to be working on a number of things for school...but It's just not happening. I'm procrastinating a lot. Its my thing.

Could you give a brief Evenings history?
Well there isn't much history yet. I bought an audio interface and a midi keyboard when i was fifteen, and I started using bootlegged copies of cubase & protools. I have some really funny recordings of myself around that age..they hopefully wont ever see the light of day. During high school I played guitar in a band called "goonies", and towards the end we started playing instrumental mogwaish stuff. I also remember I was the audio mixer for my high school's crappy daily news show, and I couldn't play any music with words...This was probably when I started listening to mainly instrumental music. I don't think a day went by in high school that i didn't listen to "cherry" by ratatat.

Who did you grow up listening to?
My mom has great taste. I listened to alot of Talking heads and Van Morrison tapes growing up. Once I got a little older my brother (who's only a year older than me) started getting me excited about finding new stuff. I probably started getting into electronic music after listening to Kid A too much..as if you could ever have too much Kid A.

Tell us a bit about your most recent release 'North Dorm'.
A lot of it was recorded in a dorm room last winter and spring, and i finally finished it all this summer. I actually used a stolen copy of ableton 8 to record it.. But ableton will be happy to hear that I recently bought a real copy.

What's the weirdest thing you've ever written a song about?
Often I have really strange/vivd dreams, and I try to write them down when I wake up sometimes. I never really understand them, but once in a while they'll have a pretty prominent subject. When I write about stuff I don't understand, things tend to end up a little askew... and I enjoy that.

Can you see yourself always being involved in music or are there any equally important aspirations you'd like to explore?
I'm not sure where I'll end up..I'm a music major, but I think about media and design a lot. I can't imagine I'll ever stop making music though. Thankfully I think I have enough time to mull it over.

What would you say was the perfect environment or situation to listen to your music in?
I think that people should decide for themselves. That said, I tend to like music that cuts me off from the rest of the world for a little while. I'm just glad that people enjoy listening to it. I want to thank each and every one of them with a high five.

Where would you love to tour?
Switzerland.

Finally, what's next for Evenings, future plans and such?
I'm really not sure, I'm trying to write more music in between school. School is kiiiiiiiilling me laura.
Get at more info and tunes from his myspace.

Wednesday, 20 October 2010

CANDY CLAWS
















Colorado's Candy Claws are my favourites right now!

Where are you located in this big wide world right now and what're you working on?
Fort Collins, CO, USA...We're touring right now for our latest LP, Hidden Lands. Thoughts of a new album are mixing around...dinosaurs??

Who did you grow up listening to?
Beach Boys, Starflyer 59. Lassie Foundation. John Denver. Avalanches.

Tell us a bit about your recent release 'Hidden Lands'.
This new album is a musical companion to "The Secret Life of the Forest," a book from the 1970s that Kay found. It has beautiful illustrations, and our music is meant to sound how the pictures look. It's a journey into the unseen processes of trees and plant life, from the tiny chemical reactions to the long, slow life cycle of a forest. We also take a look back into the deep time, the billions of years of life on earth before humans appeared.

What's the weirdest thing you've ever written a song about?
Switzerland at the World Cup

Did you initially, when starting out as a band, find it difficult to get your music out there and heard and secure shows or has it been relatively straight forward?
At first we weren't trying to get our music out there. We spent two years making an album in secret, not playing shows. It's always been our thing to make the best recordings we can, and worry about the live setup later. I think the album did more for catching people's attention than live shows have.

What would you say was the perfect environment or situation to listen to your music in?
In headphones, alone in your bedroom, with a nature book from 1960 open on your knee.

What's been your favourite show you've played so far?
A beach party on a lake!

What's the best thing about being in a band and the worst thing?
Best Thing: Touring on the West Coast / Worst Thing: Leaving the West Coast

What're Candy Claw's near future plans, what's next for you guys?
We're touring a little more in October and November, then spending the deep winter months starting a new album, our favorite thing.

Friday, 15 October 2010

CALLERS

















Gorgeous material from the New Orleans trio, the L.P is out now, so grab yourself a copy and find out more from the ever fantastic Western Vinyl Label.

Sunday, 10 October 2010

CRAFT SPELLS






















Sick band. Find out more and more and more from their myspace and a taster down below!!

First off, where are you in the world right now and what're you working on?

In my boxers at home (Lathrop, CA) working on the full length while chatting on iChat with DJ assclap.

Could you give a brief Craft Spells history?

I've been recording my own music since I was 15. Started some shitty bands. Played for some shitty bands. I work better on my own so I went back on the solo thing. I recorded two songs in December of 2009 and put them up on myspace a little before the new year. Stuff started poppin' from there.

Who did you grow up listening to?

My father played a lot of new order and depeche mode. I was also into radio hip hop during the 90s. I was really into biggy growing up.

Tell us a bit about your 7'' 'Party Talk'.

It is officially out on captured tracks to purchase.

What's the weirdest thing you've ever written a song about?

holding hands with a girl in a shower stall.

Did you initially, when starting out, find it difficult to get your music out there and heard and secure shows or has it been relatively straight forward?

I actually never sent my music out to anyone. The most I ever did was put it on myspace or share it on facebook with my friends. All the blog coverage came from the wonderful people who took the time to listen through the songs. We have never booked a show ourselves. We have good friends that help us.

What would you say was the perfect environment or situation to listen to your music in?

In a mansion alone.

What's been your favourite show you've played so far?

All the shows when we get to play with our friends.

What's the best thing about being in a band and the worst thing?

The best thing is having your tunes heard by someone far out there in the world. It's fucking great. Worst thing is trying to balance school with it.

Finally, what's next for Craft Spells, future plans and such?

The world

Craft Spells - Party Talk by Ragged Words

Friday, 1 October 2010

COMA CINEMA










Coma Cinema is Mat Cothran, the expertly ‘nostalgic pop’ pioneer . He hails from Columbia, South Carolina, adding further to the list of locations I know nothing about. Sometimes his music’s melancholic, but it’s all good for the soul to let a bit of sadness into your life and it comes in a concise little package of honest, emotive lovliness. To accompany his songs, there are some ace videos that could possibly aid the melancholic feelings even more so, but serve as perfect, accurate manifestation. Gloriously reflective stuff.

First off, where are you in the world right now and what're you working on?

At the moment i'm home here in Spartanburg, SC, which is mostly a terrible place with lots of people being murdered daily and miserable traffic. On top of that there is nowhere to play music a show here unless you're a cover band or some kind of shitty adult alternative.

I'm currently working on getting our recently finished full length entitled Blue Suicide mastered by a good friend of mine in the band Pandit. Before that I was spending very long days in the makeshift studio I threw together in my childhood home, which is now vacated.

Could you give a brief Coma Cinema history?

It's been a long, long trip through lots of different incarnations. I started when I was 15 years old, using the moniker to record really bad electro pop that no one will ever hear hopefully. I've probably have 100 different band members at this point but things always tend to end badly so I'm pretty set on doing things myself for the time being, as unfortunately lonely as that is.

I put out my first record Baby Prayers in 2009 and since then things have been continually more positive for me and the music, but there's no real goal in mind, outside of giving away as much music to the world as I can before I'm inevitably gunned down in the street or something.

Who did you grow up listening to?

The first CD I ever owned was the soundtrack to "Batman Forever" which had some really amazing songs on it like "Kiss From a Rose" by Seal and a really weird Flaming Lips song I can't quite remember the name of. My mother and my Stepfather got me into a lot of great things like Teenage Fanclub or The Replacements. I've been blessed to be surrounded by people with good taste pretty much my whole life, so I didn't have to be subjected to things like Creed when it was popular.

Tell us a bit about your most recent release 'Stoned Alone'.

While my first record was more of a compilation, taking several years to put together, Stoned Alone was much more cohesive in it's creation. In the months prior to writing it I spent many confused and deranged hours doing things I regret in places I wish I'd never gone to with people I shouldn't have been involved with, so it's mostly about that experience.

The album was supposed to be released through the "label" Arcade Sound Ltd, but instead they decided to steal the money of everyone who was kind of enough to buy the record. So yea, don't trust those guys.

What's the weirdest thing you've ever written a song about?

I generally don't go into the meanings of songs because it's such a murky, subconscious kind of thing. I don't know I'm not very good at explaining meanings, I think the songs do it much better than I ever could. The song "Flower Pills" off our first album "Baby Prayers" is about getting fucked up on sleeping medication and the whole state of being that goes with that kind of addiction, which I don't think is a very common one.

Did you initially, when starting out, find it difficult to get your music out there and heard and secure shows or has it been relatively straight forward?

Really the only thing that held me back starting out was myself. I was much to critical about making every song flawless and it kept me "in the studio" for years. If you send your music out to people and you are a human being to them and not some PR automaton, it will be heard. It takes a lot of hard work and determination and self awareness but it's only as difficult as you want it to be to be heard, especially with the internet making everything so instantaneous and connected.

What would you say was the perfect environment or situation to listen to your music in?

I really have no idea. I find it very difficult to listen to my own music, so I can't really imagine ever listening to it. Once it's finished completely it's very rare that i'll ever listen to a song I've recorded again. I know that personally, my favorite place to listen to a record is in bed with headphones, so maybe that would be the best environment to hear a Coma Cinema record.

What's been your favourite show you've played so far?

I played a show here in South Carolina a couple of months ago that was hosted in a large cavernous sort of space with very high ceilings It pretty much drenched the entire set with natural reverb and everything felt so loud and powerful.I like to be able to lose control completely and with that kind of space it's very natural to just let everything go and be real.

What's the best thing about being in a band and the worst thing?

The best thing to me is being able to have this kind of outlet to get any kind of feeling out be it negative or positive. All feeling desires is to be expressed and I can't think of a better way to express it than through music. The worst thing would definitely be the large number of people involved in the music "industry", who still go about things as if it were the 90s, failing to adapt to modern ideas like music being free for everyone, and "networking" instead of making real human to human connections. You come across a lot of these fakers while in a band for sure.

Finally, what's next for Coma Cinema, future plans and such?

Right now we're just trying to organize the release of our new album, and play as many shows as time allows. In the farther future we're working on a European tour. Aside from that I just play it by ear and hope it all works out in the end. I think we're in the best possible time to be an artist, It's exciting and I'm just happy to be alive to see it all unfold.

Coma Cinema - Only from Tyler T Williams on Vimeo.

Coma Cinema - Flower Pills from Mat Cothran on Vimeo.

What a talented dude and the swell news is that 'Stoned Alone' and other releases are kindly available for free download from the Coma Cinema SITE and watch this space for news on releases and gigs on the MYSPACE